» » Front Line Assembly - The Initial Command

Front Line Assembly - The Initial Command Album

Tracklist

1Black March
Written-By [Uncredited] – Bill Leeb
2The State
Featuring – Rhys Youth FulberWritten-By [Uncredited] – Bill Leeb, Rhys Fulber
3Ausgang Zum Himmel
Featuring – Rhys Youth FulberWritten-By [Uncredited] – Bill Leeb, Rhys Fulber
4Nine Times
Written-By [Uncredited] – Bill Leeb
5Insanity Lurks Nearby
Written-By [Uncredited] – Bill Leeb
6No Control
Written-By [Uncredited] – Bill Leeb
7Slaughter House
Written-By [Uncredited] – Bill Leeb
8Casualties
Featuring – Rhys Youth FulberWritten-By [Uncredited] – Bill Leeb, Rhys Fulber

Versions

CategoryArtistTitle (Format)LabelCategoryCountryYear
A-187Frontline Assembly The Initial Command ‎(Cass, Album, RE, Chr)ROIRA-187US1990
KK 006Frontline Assembly The Initial Command ‎(CD, Album)KK RecordsKK 006Belgium1987
CD ZOT 189Front Line Assembly The Initial Command ‎(CD, Album, RE, Dig)Zoth OmmogCD ZOT 189Germany1997
TMD 9175Front Line Assembly The Initial Command ‎(CD, Album, RE)Third Mind RecordsTMD 9175US1992
KK 006Frontline Assembly The Initial Command ‎(CD, Album, RP)KK RecordsKK 006BelgiumUnknown

Credits

  • Band [Front Line Assembly Is]Bill Leeb, Rhys Youth Fulber
  • Cover [Cover Art]C. Lepke
  • Design, Artwork [Production]David Rosychuk
  • EngineerBill Leeb
  • Mixed ByMichael Balch
  • Other [Appreciation To] – Alain Neffe
  • Producer [Uncredited]Bill Leeb, Michael Balch

Notes

Some copies contain an A4 KK Records info sheet.

[Rear sleeve]
"Oppression Breeds Violence"

Front Line Assembly is Bill Leeb with Rhys Youth Fulber on 'The State', 'Casualties', 'Ausgang Zum Himmel'.

KK records - karthuizerstraat 18, rue des chartreux - B-1000 brussels (belgium)

1st catalog# appears on labels & spine.
2nd catalog# appears on back sleeve.
Track durations not given on the release.

Uncredited info: All songs Copyright Control.

Barcodes

  • Matrix / Runout (Runout side A, hand-etched): KK 001-AI FOON
  • Matrix / Runout (Runout side B, hand-etched): KK 001-BI FOON

Companies

  • Published By – Copyright Control
  • Lacquer Cut At – Foon

Video

Front Line Assembly - The Initial Command Album

Performer: Front Line Assembly

Title: The Initial Command

Country: Belgium

Release date: Dec 1987

Label: KK Records

Style: Dark Ambient, EBM, Industrial

Catalog: KK001, KK 001

Genre: Electronic

Size MP3: 1978 mb

Size FLAC: 2153 mb

Rating: 4.9 / 5

Votes: 825

Record source: Vinyl, LP, Album

Related to Front Line Assembly - The Initial Command

Unirtay
I will never forget my « initial » introduction to F.L.A.; my best friend at the time came back from Dutchy’s record store (R.I.P.; was an underground institution in Montreal, semi-similarly as Bunker records) and being a “rental” member (one could rent out records and tapes for a week’s time) came back with this LP, after we had both stumbled upon “No Control” from an underground radio show at the time. We both were stunned at this “new sound” we hadn’t been exposed to. We thought Skinny Puppy and Front 242 were “the sh*t” in terms of cold industrial music (we were still novices back in those days), and weren’t ready for this record, which to this day remains a testament to this period in time. Never before had we heard so coldly calculated machinic maddening repetition with such a drive and fervor; this was the purest form of “industrial” (or so we thought) - music seemingly designed to induce unease and a perpetual sence of anxiousness and dread. And even today, whenever I re-visit this album, an uncanny sensation of stress envelops me, reminding me of those early days of pre-dancefloor EBM assault.“The Initial Command” is a serious must listen to any fan of the band, at the very least to hear where they came from. With “Total Terror 1 + 2” readily available, we can more easily hear the genesis of the post-Puppy Leeb, and even elements from those archival collections can be heard on this album. Although the general sound of F.L.A. would slowly mutate with each subsequent album released afterwards, it is still important to understand where they came from and the other directions the project itself could have explored instead of what they chose to focus on. Not for everyone as this early entry in the band’s repertoire may be misunderstood as a necessary birth pain, to some of us it remains, alongside the follow-up “State Of Mind”, one of the most representative acheivements of a band just starting off on their long journey. I personnaly recommend it hands down and would still consider this a great industrial album from start to finish.
Unirtay
I will never forget my « initial » introduction to F.L.A.; my best friend at the time came back from Dutchy’s record store (R.I.P.; was an underground institution in Montreal, semi-similarly as Bunker records) and being a “rental” member (one could rent out records and tapes for a week’s time) came back with this LP, after we had both stumbled upon “No Control” from an underground radio show at the time. We both were stunned at this “new sound” we hadn’t been exposed to. We thought Skinny Puppy and Front 242 were “the sh*t” in terms of cold industrial music (we were still novices back in those days), and weren’t ready for this record, which to this day remains a testament to this period in time. Never before had we heard so coldly calculated machinic maddening repetition with such a drive and fervor; this was the purest form of “industrial” (or so we thought) - music seemingly designed to induce unease and a perpetual sence of anxiousness and dread. And even today, whenever I re-visit this album, an uncanny sensation of stress envelops me, reminding me of those early days of pre-dancefloor EBM assault.“The Initial Command” is a serious must listen to any fan of the band, at the very least to hear where they came from. With “Total Terror 1 + 2” readily available, we can more easily hear the genesis of the post-Puppy Leeb, and even elements from those archival collections can be heard on this album. Although the general sound of F.L.A. would slowly mutate with each subsequent album released afterwards, it is still important to understand where they came from and the other directions the project itself could have explored instead of what they chose to focus on. Not for everyone as this early entry in the band’s repertoire may be misunderstood as a necessary birth pain, to some of us it remains, alongside the follow-up “State Of Mind”, one of the most representative acheivements of a band just starting off on their long journey. I personnaly recommend it hands down and would still consider this a great industrial album from start to finish.
Envias
Nine times was the one that got me..Came across this album in 1990 (Australia) I don't think I'll ever get sick of it either..
Envias
Nine times was the one that got me..Came across this album in 1990 (Australia) I don't think I'll ever get sick of it either..
Kagda
This is THE FLA-album for me. I bought it in 1987, and I fell in love with Black March & Nine Times (they are still in rotation in my mp3-player).
Kagda
This is THE FLA-album for me. I bought it in 1987, and I fell in love with Black March & Nine Times (they are still in rotation in my mp3-player).
Obong
I think this is one of FLA's better albums. Very dark and deep EBM, and some of the tracks sound Cabaret Voltaire-like almost, circa 'Crackdown' only deeper (at least in my opinion). The whole album is like a trip, but side 2 is noticeably a little more dancey. It's not as hard or fast as alot of other EBM stuff, but it's really a beautiful work of industrial music. "Black March" and "No Control" sort of forecast the harder stuff they would do closer to the nineties, and I don't know if fans of their later work would like this album, but it's still worth getting just for the overall futuristic and dark tone and mood the whole album sets, if not the music itself.
Obong
I think this is one of FLA's better albums. Very dark and deep EBM, and some of the tracks sound Cabaret Voltaire-like almost, circa 'Crackdown' only deeper (at least in my opinion). The whole album is like a trip, but side 2 is noticeably a little more dancey. It's not as hard or fast as alot of other EBM stuff, but it's really a beautiful work of industrial music. "Black March" and "No Control" sort of forecast the harder stuff they would do closer to the nineties, and I don't know if fans of their later work would like this album, but it's still worth getting just for the overall futuristic and dark tone and mood the whole album sets, if not the music itself.
Daron
The Initial Command is what i recon to be one of the major influence to the whole EBM genre. If one is new to EBM, listen in to this album :) Its for sure one of my fav albums!
Daron
The Initial Command is what i recon to be one of the major influence to the whole EBM genre. If one is new to EBM, listen in to this album :) Its for sure one of my fav albums!
Jaiarton
^^Agreed! I will definitely say, FLA was way ahead of their time. Even after all of these years, this is still one of my personal favs from them, and still the most listen to of all my FLA albums. Some of their new stuff is cool, but there is just something about the early works, you cannot really compare it to anything today.
Jaiarton
^^Agreed! I will definitely say, FLA was way ahead of their time. Even after all of these years, this is still one of my personal favs from them, and still the most listen to of all my FLA albums. Some of their new stuff is cool, but there is just something about the early works, you cannot really compare it to anything today.