» » D.J. Jealous J. vs. D.J. Jock D. / D.J. Jealous J. & D.J. Jock D. - DJ Wars

D.J. Jealous J. vs. D.J. Jock D. / D.J. Jealous J. & D.J. Jock D. - DJ Wars Album

Tracklist

1D.J. Jealous J. vs. D.J. Jock D.DJ Wars (The Battle)
Written-By – C. Walton, J. Scheffer
4:36
2D.J. Jealous J. & D.J. Jock D.Party Time (Vocal)
Rap [Uncredited] – Jealous JWritten-By – Dean Pelle
4:45
3D.J. Jealous J. & D.J. Jock D.Party Time (Inst.)
Written-By – Dean Pelle
3:18
4D.J. Jealous J. vs. D.J. Jock D.Scratch Pad0:17

Versions

CategoryArtistTitle (Format)LabelCategoryCountryYear
CD.505D.J. Jealous J. vs. D.J. Jock D. / D.J. Jealous J. & D.J. Jock D. D.J. Jealous J. vs. D.J. Jock D. / D.J. Jealous J. & D.J. Jock D. - DJ Wars / Party Time ‎(12", Red)Cut It Up DefCD.505US1989

Credits

  • Drum Programming [Beats Producted By], Producer [Beats Producted By]D.J. Jock-D
  • Executive Producer – Scorpio

Notes

Side A: Our Jam Pub.
Side B: Our Jam Pub. (BMI)
©℗1989 D.J. Jealous J.
Mas-Jam Productions Inc.

Barcodes

  • Rights Society: BMI
  • Matrix / Runout (Side A): CD.505-A
  • Matrix / Runout (Side B): CD.505-B
  • Matrix / Runout (Runout Side A): 505-A MIAMI TAPE N-20N of
  • Matrix / Runout (Runout Side B): 505-[Scratched "A"]B MIAMI TAPE N-S-0N of

Companies

  • Published By – Our Music Pub.
  • Mastered At – Miami Tape Inc.

Video

D.J. Jealous J. vs. D.J. Jock D. / D.J. Jealous J. & D.J. Jock D. - DJ Wars Album

Performer: D.J. Jealous J. vs. D.J. Jock D. / D.J. Jealous J. & D.J. Jock D.

Title: DJ Wars

Country: US

Release date: 15 Sep 1989

Label: Cut It Up Def

Style: Bass Music

Catalog: CD.505

Genre: Electronic / Rap & Hip-Hop

Size MP3: 2049 mb

Size FLAC: 1503 mb

Rating: 4.1 / 5

Votes: 801

Record source: Vinyl, 12", 33 ⅓ RPM

Related to D.J. Jealous J. vs. D.J. Jock D. / D.J. Jealous J. & D.J. Jock D. - DJ Wars

Dibei
For some time I ignored the material of the Miami Bass, especially what was played in Brazil for some years - M-4 Sers, The Dogs, Young & Restless, among others. As I listened to Electro Rap a lot in that period, the comparison was inevitable: I preferred electro from the 1984-1986 phase to the detriment of the Miami Bass that took shape from the mid-1980s. Obviously, the mix between Electro and Miami Bass made by artists like Dynamix II, MC ADE and Maggotron always sounded interesting to me, but no doubt I've always seen more inventiveness in the Electro scene.

However, I tend to run into contradiction in the process of developing my musical research, and so I found a new freshness on the Miami Bass records that were produced in the golden phase of the style, which, in my point of view, is represented by the late 1980s. Incidentally, at this time black music was arranged as a jukebox for the producers and deejays, in a musical appropriation that moved the American music industry: many "stole" elements of songs by James Brown and, at the same time, very much "stole" bits of Kraftwerk music.

In a way, the Miami Bass dee jays (as well dee jays hip-hop from other strands) saw the History of American Black Music as an impromptu amusement park: in each record, in each specific play, they were able to muster excerpts, memoirs, and aesthetic references from other Black Music styles, and through the use of samples, of the tones coming from electronic drum machines like roland 808 and SP 1200, and in a proper way to compose the raps, the young ghettos of Miami created a new musical world.

The result of these sound experiences appears prominently in the material in the catalog of the record company Cut It Up Def. And, in my field of vision, this record symbolizes the essence of the record company and is a record that made me see a great trait of imagination within the spectrum of the Miami Bass. I love the scratches and cuts on the two tracks on Side A - "DJ Wars (The Battle)" and "Scratch Pad". However, my review was done thinking about the track "Party Time". This track uses samples from the 1982 British electro classic, "122 BPM," from Jive Rhythm Trax. This electro, along with classics like "Clear" (Cybotron), "Planet Rock" (Afrika Bambaataa & Soul Sonic Force), "Electric Kingdom" (Twilight 22), forms a set of electros the construction of the Miami Bass. Anyway, a musical style is not born out of nothing, is it? The Miami Bass has its roots in Electro. Another electro that was used to build the track "Party Time": is Hashim's classic "Al-Naafiysh (The Soul), " with the famous "It's Time" drone - a reference to scratches and cuttings for Miami Bass and Hip-Hop Old School Dee Jays.

Curiously, the Miami Bass hides a secret: great dee jays from Miami Bass also knew how to compose excellent raps. The DXJ, of the legendary group Maggotron, was one of them. See, for example, the raps he composed under pseudonyms like The Empyre, Third Degree and Mc Nightmare. Here we have two amazing dee jays - DJ Jealous J (Jim Scheffer) and Jock D (Chris Walton) - who are two pillars of the Miami Bass and two top references on the record label Cut It Up Def. It took me a while to realize that they are rhyming in this track, "Party Time". I find it striking how they structure the verses in this song. They have a very peculiar rhyming style. I'd say maybe they had influence from the flow of the years of Electro Rap - Afrika Bambaataa & Soul Sonic Force, Newcleus ( the tracks Jam On It and Let's Jam, especially) and Mantronix, to exemplify - with a hybrid blend with the flow characteristic of the Miami Bass - Kooley C, to exemplify - and following a little the metrics that were emerging in NY (Golden Era) Rap at that time - Big Daddy Kane and Rakim, for example.

In my opinion, taking into account the lyrics skills, this song has one of the most special metrics of the Miami Bass of all time. Considering the maxim that NY has always dictated the rules in hip-hop, it is possible to understand the reason for some records like this did not have much repercussion outside the state of Florida, unfortunately. Anyway, this record represents an era in which hip-hop artists, regardless of the cities they live in or the styles they followed, were bolder, more creative, and had credit for innovating.

Cheers,
Rodrigo.
Dibei
For some time I ignored the material of the Miami Bass, especially what was played in Brazil for some years - M-4 Sers, The Dogs, Young & Restless, among others. As I listened to Electro Rap a lot in that period, the comparison was inevitable: I preferred electro from the 1984-1986 phase to the detriment of the Miami Bass that took shape from the mid-1980s. Obviously, the mix between Electro and Miami Bass made by artists like Dynamix II, MC ADE and Maggotron always sounded interesting to me, but no doubt I've always seen more inventiveness in the Electro scene.

However, I tend to run into contradiction in the process of developing my musical research, and so I found a new freshness on the Miami Bass records that were produced in the golden phase of the style, which, in my point of view, is represented by the late 1980s. Incidentally, at this time black music was arranged as a jukebox for the producers and deejays, in a musical appropriation that moved the American music industry: many "stole" elements of songs by James Brown and, at the same time, very much "stole" bits of Kraftwerk music.

In a way, the Miami Bass dee jays (as well dee jays hip-hop from other strands) saw the History of American Black Music as an impromptu amusement park: in each record, in each specific play, they were able to muster excerpts, memoirs, and aesthetic references from other Black Music styles, and through the use of samples, of the tones coming from electronic drum machines like roland 808 and SP 1200, and in a proper way to compose the raps, the young ghettos of Miami created a new musical world.

The result of these sound experiences appears prominently in the material in the catalog of the record company Cut It Up Def. And, in my field of vision, this record symbolizes the essence of the record company and is a record that made me see a great trait of imagination within the spectrum of the Miami Bass. I love the scratches and cuts on the two tracks on Side A - "DJ Wars (The Battle)" and "Scratch Pad". However, my review was done thinking about the track "Party Time". This track uses samples from the 1982 British electro classic, "122 BPM," from Jive Rhythm Trax. This electro, along with classics like "Clear" (Cybotron), "Planet Rock" (Afrika Bambaataa & Soul Sonic Force), "Electric Kingdom" (Twilight 22), forms a set of electros the construction of the Miami Bass. Anyway, a musical style is not born out of nothing, is it? The Miami Bass has its roots in Electro. Another electro that was used to build the track "Party Time": is Hashim's classic "Al-Naafiysh (The Soul), " with the famous "It's Time" drone - a reference to scratches and cuttings for Miami Bass and Hip-Hop Old School Dee Jays.

Curiously, the Miami Bass hides a secret: great dee jays from Miami Bass also knew how to compose excellent raps. The DXJ, of the legendary group Maggotron, was one of them. See, for example, the raps he composed under pseudonyms like The Empyre, Third Degree and Mc Nightmare. Here we have two amazing dee jays - DJ Jealous J (Jim Scheffer) and Jock D (Chris Walton) - who are two pillars of the Miami Bass and two top references on the record label Cut It Up Def. It took me a while to realize that they are rhyming in this track, "Party Time". I find it striking how they structure the verses in this song. They have a very peculiar rhyming style. I'd say maybe they had influence from the flow of the years of Electro Rap - Afrika Bambaataa & Soul Sonic Force, Newcleus ( the tracks Jam On It and Let's Jam, especially) and Mantronix, to exemplify - with a hybrid blend with the flow characteristic of the Miami Bass - Kooley C, to exemplify - and following a little the metrics that were emerging in NY (Golden Era) Rap at that time - Big Daddy Kane and Rakim, for example.

In my opinion, taking into account the lyrics skills, this song has one of the most special metrics of the Miami Bass of all time. Considering the maxim that NY has always dictated the rules in hip-hop, it is possible to understand the reason for some records like this did not have much repercussion outside the state of Florida, unfortunately. Anyway, this record represents an era in which hip-hop artists, regardless of the cities they live in or the styles they followed, were bolder, more creative, and had credit for innovating.

Cheers,
Rodrigo.